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Veuve Clicquot Champagne Cave Privée 1979 Bottle 75cL

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Veuve Clicquot Cave Privée 1979

Wooden case with bottle - 75 cL

Veuve Clicquot Cave Privée 1979

Wooden case with bottle - 75 cL
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  • Product Details

    This vintage is a blend of grapes from 22 different crus, all classified as grand or premier. It has a wonderful texture and a fresh, vibrant palate that carries salinity from the chalky terroir. The 1979 has considerable ageing potential – a rarity for the decade’s vintages – thanks to that year’s late harvest and the high-quality grapes, which took time to ripen.
  • How to enjoy

    • Service temperature - 10-12°C
    • When to drink - Drink now through 2020
    • Storage advice - Store horizontally in a cool (10-15°C), dark place, and away from vibrations
    • Closure - Cork
    • Health warning - Contains sulphites
    • Alcohol by volume - 12.0%
    • Dosage - 4 g/L
  • Blend and Origin

    Veuve Clicquot Cave Privée Rosé 1979

    The 1979 is a blend of 22 different grands and premiers crus, and comprises 49% pinot noir, 5% meunier and 27% chardonnay, with the addition of 19% red wine from the estate’s vines in Bouzy. The weather in 1979 produced extremely good-quality grapes: flowering was rapid for the chardonnay vines, and slightly more staggered for the pinot noir and meunier.


A new philosophy for vintage champagne

A remembrance of times past
A remembrance of times past

At the end of a decade that did not bequeath many vintages capable of long ageing, this fine champagne, from the Cave Privée collection, was the exception that proved the rule. A late harvest in 1979 produced high-quality grapes and gave the maison a vintage that adhered to Madame Clicquot’s directive, that her wines must “delight the palate and the eye.” This rosé champagne was held back in the ideal conditions of Veuve Clicquot’s cellars, undisgorged and undisturbed on its lees until release. The Cave Privée champagnes are only disgorged once they have reached perfection, with each bottle individually numbered.

A slow start but a striking finish
A slow start but a striking finish

A harsh winter and cool spring, with extreme frosts in May, slowed growth in the vineyards. Despite this, flowering was good – rapid for the chardonnay and slightly more spread out for the pinot noir and meunier. The summer months saw a reasonable supply of sunshine and warm temperatures, resulting in adequate ripening. Harvesting – later than usual – began at the beginning of October, and the grapes were of excellent quality.

The art of rosé assemblage
The art of rosé assemblage

Blending is a team effort – one that demands concentration, attention and years of experience. At Veuve Clicquot, experts aim for a perfect balance, which they found with the 1979 vintage – a harmony of the grape varietals’ aromatic structure and flavour that endows it with a dazzling personality. It was Madame Clicquot who first thought of blending still red wine with champagne to create rosé champagne. Before her groundbreaking experiment, which rewrote the history of champagne assemblage, elderberries had been used to impart a pink colour.

Food pairing:
Requiring hearty, rich flavours

Starter

Start with a crayfish tail, served with creamy chestnut purée and sautéed girolle mushrooms.

Main

A lamb tagine with subtle spices and dried fruit over cumin semolina is an excellent match.

A new philosophy for vintage champagne

A remembrance of times past
A remembrance of times past

At the end of a decade that did not bequeath many vintages capable of long ageing, this fine champagne, from the Cave Privée collection, was the exception that proved the rule. A late harvest in 1979 produced high-quality grapes and gave the maison a vintage that adhered to Madame Clicquot’s directive, that her wines must “delight the palate and the eye.” This rosé champagne was held back in the ideal conditions of Veuve Clicquot’s cellars, undisgorged and undisturbed on its lees until release. The Cave Privée champagnes are only disgorged once they have reached perfection, with each bottle individually numbered.

A slow start but a striking finish
A slow start but a striking finish

A harsh winter and cool spring, with extreme frosts in May, slowed growth in the vineyards. Despite this, flowering was good – rapid for the chardonnay and slightly more spread out for the pinot noir and meunier. The summer months saw a reasonable supply of sunshine and warm temperatures, resulting in adequate ripening. Harvesting – later than usual – began at the beginning of October, and the grapes were of excellent quality.

The art of rosé assemblage
The art of rosé assemblage

Blending is a team effort – one that demands concentration, attention and years of experience. At Veuve Clicquot, experts aim for a perfect balance, which they found with the 1979 vintage – a harmony of the grape varietals’ aromatic structure and flavour that endows it with a dazzling personality. It was Madame Clicquot who first thought of blending still red wine with champagne to create rosé champagne. Before her groundbreaking experiment, which rewrote the history of champagne assemblage, elderberries had been used to impart a pink colour.

Food pairing:
Requiring hearty, rich flavours

Starter

Start with a crayfish tail, served with creamy chestnut purée and sautéed girolle mushrooms.

Main

A lamb tagine with subtle spices and dried fruit over cumin semolina is an excellent match.